Date of Award

2-2019

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Ministry (DMin)

Department

Seminary

First Advisor

Darrell Peregrym, DMin

Second Advisor

Pablo Morales, DMin

Abstract

For three hundred years, the modern missions movement has established a paradigm in which evangelical churches, denominations, and parachurch agencies have recruited, trained, funded, and sent missionaries around the world. Taking seriously Christ’s command to reach the nations with the gospel, U.S. churches spend millions of dollars each year to send a few select missionaries to faraway nations, while most Christians are not engaged in cross-cultural ministry. But the world has changed. Now there are millions of foreigners living in the United States. I propose that evangelical church leaders consider a new strategy that involves training American Christians to minister to internationals in their own communities.

Section One of this dissertation will look at the current status of the United States with a record number of internationals living in and visiting U.S. cities.

Section Two will discuss the traditional ministries and strategies American evangelicals have utilized to engage foreigners.

Section Three will make the case for a new paradigm in which evangelical churches across America are actively involved in cross-cultural ministries focused on internationals. Special attention will be given to identifying potential problems encountered by churches who seek to develop strategies to minister to internationals.

Section Four and Five will describe my artifact. The proposal for a book entitled Reaching the World (across the street). This easy-to-read handbook is targeted at church leaders looking for practical ideas for reaching internationals in their communities.

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