Title

Paradox

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2006

Abstract

Excerpt: "‘Paradox’ is derived from two words that literally mean against opinion. The Oxford English Dictionary (1989; vol. 11, p. 185) identifies several meanings for ‘paradox’. It may refer to: (1) claims contrary to common opinion, often suggesting that the statement is incredible, absurd or fantastic, but sometimes with a favourable connotation as a correction for ignorance; (2) a statement that seems self-contradictory, but which is actually well founded; (3) a statement that involves a genuine *contradiction; (4) in *logic, a conclusion based on acceptable premises and sound *reasoning that nonetheless is self-contradictory. These inconsistent uses of the term pose practical problems for communication, as the intended meaning may not always be apparent."

Comments

Taken from New Dictionary of Christian Apologetics edited by Gavin McGrath, W.C. Campbell-Jack and C. Stephen Evans. Copyright (c) 2006 edited by Gavin McGrath, W.C. Campbell-Jack and C. Stephen Evans. Used by permission of InterVarsity Press, P.O. Box 1400, Downers Grove, IL 60515, USA. www.ivpress.com

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